Education in the Health Professions

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2021  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 58--69

Student perceptions of iBooks as a clinical skills learning resource as compared to learning management software and an online video-hosting site


Jamie Perkins1, Julie A Hunt2, Stacy L Anderson2, Undine Christmann2, Philippa Gibbons3, Seth Chapman3, Jennifer T Johnson4, John J Dascanio3 
1 University of Arizona College of Veterinary Medicine, Oro Valley, Arizona, USA
2 Lincoln Memorial University College of Veterinary Medicine, Harrogate, Tennessee, USA
3 Texas Tech University School of Veterinary Medicine, Amarillo, Texas, USA
4 Lincoln Memorial University College of Veterinary Medicine, Harrogate, Tennessee, USA; Wellington Veterinary Hospital, Wellington, Colorado, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Julie A Hunt
Lincoln Memorial University College of Veterinary Medicine, 6965 Cumberland Gap Pkwy, Harrogate TN.
USA

Background: Learning resources to support clinical skills training can be delivered through a number of technology platforms, and listening to students’ preferences can be helpful in leveraging the use of technology in the laboratory. Objective: This study sought to compare students’ preference of clinical skills educational resources delivered by iBooks with that by a learning management system (Blackboard) and a video-hosting website (YouTube). Methods: A survey was conducted among veterinary students (n = 73) who completed their first year of clinical skills training. During the fall semester, they utilized 14 free iBooks, one per clinical skills laboratory, to prepare for fall laboratories. In the spring semester, their learning materials were provided on Blackboard and YouTube. At the end of the academic year, they were surveyed about their experiences and preferences. Results: Students reported a preference for the iBooks to the Blackboard and YouTube resources. This preference was the result of the convenience of having all resources on a single, well-organized platform and having access to iBooks after graduation as a perpetual reference, unlike Blackboard resources that students lose access to upon graduation according to the university policy. Students reported technological issues with iBooks, including downloading problems, at a similar rate as technological issues with Blackboard and YouTube. Conclusion: Educators should be guided by students’ preferences, provided the learning outcomes are similar, when selecting platforms for providing student educational resources. Although the iBooks seem preferable, additional research is necessary to understand how students use the iBooks and how that use impacts their clinical skills course performance.


How to cite this article:
Perkins J, Hunt JA, Anderson SL, Christmann U, Gibbons P, Chapman S, Johnson JT, Dascanio JJ. Student perceptions of iBooks as a clinical skills learning resource as compared to learning management software and an online video-hosting site.Educ Health Prof 2021;4:58-69


How to cite this URL:
Perkins J, Hunt JA, Anderson SL, Christmann U, Gibbons P, Chapman S, Johnson JT, Dascanio JJ. Student perceptions of iBooks as a clinical skills learning resource as compared to learning management software and an online video-hosting site. Educ Health Prof [serial online] 2021 [cited 2022 Jan 25 ];4:58-69
Available from: https://www.ehpjournal.com/article.asp?issn=2590-1761;year=2021;volume=4;issue=2;spage=58;epage=69;aulast=Perkins;type=0